What's Happening In Art This Week

1. Pia Camil: A Pot for Latch

Pia Camil, The Little Dog Laughed, installation view, image courtesy Blum and Poe

Pia Camil, The Little Dog Laughed, installation view, image courtesy Blum and Poe

Pia Carmil, deeply influenced by her native Mexico City, provides a view of Mexican that could only be seen by an insider. She simultaneously displays a deep love for her city and culture while critiquing many of Mexico’s cultural norms.  She also engages with the history of modernism and looks at the failures of urban life and the potential for regrowth and repair.

A Pot for a Latch is her first solo New York exhibition. The exhibition is comprised of her recent works and conceptual explorations. The exhibition was designed specifically for the lobby space of the gallery. Carmil created grid like structures comprised of lines and geometric shapes that she uses to display her objects. The structures are inspired by display systems that are generally used by vendors.  

The title of the exhibition refers to a ceremonial gift-giving festival (potlatch) practiced by the Native-American peoples of the Pacific Northwest coast. Viewers of the exhibition are encouraged to bring objects and swap them with the objects that are displayed in the exhibition.

Pia Camil's A Pot for a Latch is on view at The New Museum, January 15 - April 17 2016.

2. Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse

A detail of Claude Monet's painting, Lady in the Garden, 1867. Photograph: Vladimir Terebenin/The State Hermitage Museum

A detail of Claude Monet's painting, Lady in the Garden, 1867. Photograph: Vladimir Terebenin/The State Hermitage Museum

This exhibition looks at the role that gardens have played in art from the early 1960s through to the 1920s. This period was a time of social change and innovation in the arts and this exhibition is evidence of this. The garden gave the artists of this period a chance to create new innovations in art through their exploration of the world around them.

Monet arguably the most important painter of gardens is used as the starting point of the exhibition. Monet once said that he owed his painting "to flowers". The exhibition displays a great selection of works by Monet, including the monumental Agapanthus Triptych. At a briefing held for the exhibition Dumas announced “Not everybody knows quite what a serious and unbelievably knowledgeable gardener and horticulturalist Monet was ... he himself thought he was a better gardener than painter.”

This exhibition also includes works by Renoir, Cezanne, Sargent, Van Gogh and Klimt. There are around 120 paintings in the show, 35 of them by Monet.

The exhibition Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse will be held at the Royal Academy from 30 January - 20 April 2016 

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Kathrin Sonntag Installation view: Photo-Poetics: An Anthology, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photograph: David Heald

Kathrin Sonntag Installation view: Photo-Poetics: An Anthology, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photograph: David Heald

This group exhibition features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Dvey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag and Sara VanDerBeek.   

The artists in the exhibition draw on the history of Conceptualism. They use a primarily studio-based approach to still-life photography, which examines the representation of objects. At a time when digital photography is dominant these artists look at the medium of photography and seek to discover its nature and traditions.  They attempt to rematerialize the photograph. To do so they create artist's books, installations, printing, film and photo-sculptures.

Jennifer Blessing, senior curator of photography at the museum stated “This is not selfie-friendly work” and added that “You need to look at it. It’s quiet and contemplative.” It is the kind of work that needs to be viewed in ‘real life’.   

Photo-Poetics: An anthology is on view at the Guggenheim Museum through March 23, 2016. 

4. Agitprop!

“The People’s Plate,” by Otabenga Jones & Associates.

“The People’s Plate,” by Otabenga Jones & Associates.

Agitprop!” at the Brooklyn Museum includes this giant mural, “The People’s Plate,” by Otabenga Jones & Associates, at the Lawndale Art Center in Houston, part of a health education initiative. Credit Otabenga Jones & Associates

Artist often aim to elicit political and social change by showcasing their work. Agitprop is a term, a combination of agitation and propaganda, that directly reflects the artist’s intent to provoke this change.  

The exhibition Agitprop! links contemporary art that focuses on eliciting social change with historic activist movements. Initially the exhibition features twenty contemporary artists who comment on contemporary issues in relation to five historical case studies. The works displayed tackle issues such as human rights matters, environmental advocacy and protests against war.

In the months following the exhibition’s opening additional contemporary work will be added to the exhibition. In this way the exhibition itself changes and thus reflects the aim of the work within the exhibition.  

The exhibition displays work from a wide range of medium including photography, prints, film, banners, songs, street actions, digital files and web platforms.

Agitprop! is organized by the staff of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

Agitprop! Is on display from December 11, 2015- August 7, 2016 at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. 

5. Jackson Pollock’s Mural Energy Made Visible

Jackson Pollock: Mural, 1943 © Pollock-Krasner Foundation/ VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Jackson Pollock: Mural, 1943 © Pollock-Krasner Foundation/ VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Jackson Pollock’s mural features semi-abstract personages and gestural marks common to Pollock’s work. The Mural Energy Made Visible is the largest work that Pollock every created.

The work itself is an extraordinary artistic achievement, but it stands for more than just a competent work of art. It was conceived of during a time when America was traumatized by the Second World War. It provided a ‘new beginning’ for American Art and became the impetus for the creation of the new movement that was to go by the name of Abstract Expressionism.

The mural was commissioned by the art collector Peggy Guggenheim.

The mural reflects a wide variety of ideas and influences such as Picasso’s work of the Guernica, wartime action photography, Native American Indian art and the work of the great Mexican muralists Jose Clemente Orozco and David Alfaro Siqueiros.

Jackson Pollock’s mural Energy Made Visible is on show from 12 November 2015 – 10 April 2016 at Kunst Halle by Deutsche Bank.

 

 

2016, NewsClaudia ElliottComment