What's Happening In Art This Week

1. Dean Levin: XTC

Dean Levin, X, 2015, UV curable ink on polished steel and oil on linen, image courtesy of KOHN GALLERY

Dean Levin, X, 2015, UV curable ink on polished steel and oil on linen, image courtesy of KOHN GALLERY

T by Dean Levin, image courtesy of KOHN GALLERY

T by Dean Levin, image courtesy of KOHN GALLERY

Dean Levin’s solo exhibition XTC is a conceptual and physical exploration of architectural ideas and motifs and an in depth look at ideas related to space and perception. Levin’s background in architecture is evident in his work as he draws the visitor’s attention to the physical gallery space. The exhibition is made up of three distinct sculptural “vignettes”. Each vignette is defined by a strip of carpet on the gallery floor. On display are three inter-related and evolving projects. Firstly, there are Levin’s mirror diptychs. These are mirrored panels printed with enlarged hand-drawn grids, which are paired with monochrome canvases. Second are, the three new wooden line sculptures. And thirdly there are Levin’s 5-part convex paintings.  

 Levin’s uses a mixture of industrial and traditional art materials. He seeks to explore the difference and tensions between the world of mechanical reproduction and that of the handmade artistic creation.

Dean Levin: XTC will be on view until February 27, 2016 at Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles.

2. Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective

Marcel Broodthaets, Untitled, Eggshells with the colors of the Belgian flag

Marcel Broodthaets, Untitled, Eggshells with the colors of the Belgian flag

Marcel Broodthaets, images projected onto a shipping crate.

Marcel Broodthaets, images projected onto a shipping crate.

Marcel Broodthaets (1924-1976), born in Belgian, began his career as a poet. He also dabbled in other areas; he was a bookseller, a photojournalist and a short film maker. In 1964 he wrote “I’m no good at anything. I am 40 years old”. He wondered if you could finally sell something and be successful. He then turned to art.  Over the next 12 years he practiced as an artist. His work retained a poetic quality. It also has a strong conceptual basis and a lighter more humorous side. He asks the viewer to simultaneously look, read and listen to his work, which creates a sense of confusion and instability.  This exhibition is the first retrospective look at Broodthaers work to be held in New York. It brings together key works from all areas of his art making and looks at the multifaceted nature of his career.   

“Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective” is on show February 14 - May 15, 2016 at the Museum of Modern Art. “Marcel Broodthaers: Écriture” runs through March 26 at Michael Werner Gallery Manhattan. 

3. Suzanne Valadon, Maurice Utrillo, André Utter : 12, rue Cortot 1912-1926

Suzanne Valadon, La tireuse de cartes, 1912, Association des amis du Petit Palais, Genève © Petit Palais, Genève

Suzanne Valadon, La tireuse de cartes, 1912, Association des amis du Petit Palais, Genève © Petit Palais, Genève

The exhibition marks 150 years since the birth of Suzanne Valadon. Suzanne Valadon was born in Bessines-sur-Gartempe in 1865 and died in Pris in 1938. She shares the exhibition with her second husband Andre Utter and her son Maurice Utrillo.

 Suzanne Valadon was an artist’s model who became a painter in her own right under the instruction of Edgar Degas. At the turn of the 20th century, the studios of 12-14 Rue Cortot was home to numerous artists. It was a vibrant place filled with many talented artists. Valadon lived there until 1905 with her first husband Paul Moussis, and returned to the studio in 1912 with her son and second husband. Valadon’s most productive years were spent at the studio. The three artists became known as le Trio Infernal.

Suzanne Valadon, Maurice Utrillo, André Utter, à l’atelier 12, rue Cortot, 1912-1926, is on show at Musée de Montmartre. 16 October 2015-15 February 2016.  It has been extended until March 13th 2016

4. Monster Roster: Existentialist Art in Postwar Chicago

Leon Golub, Siamese Sphinx II, 1955, Lacquer on Masonite. Private Collection.

Leon Golub, Siamese Sphinx II, 1955, Lacquer on Masonite. Private Collection.

Dominick Di Meo, Fallen Hero, c. 1956, Paint on plaster and Masonite on wood panel. Private Collection

Dominick Di Meo, Fallen Hero, c. 1956, Paint on plaster and Masonite on wood panel. Private Collection

The term ‘Monster Roster’ was coined by the artist and writer Franz Schulze (whose work is on view in the exhibition) in 1959. The term was used in reference to a group of Chicago artists whose artwork is both figurative and expressive. The term Monster Roster was a reference to the Chicago Bears and the Monsters of the Midway.

 This exhibition is the first comprehensive look at the art of postwar Chicago. Some of the artists included in the exhibition are Leon Golub, Seymour Rosofsky, Nancy Spero, Cosmo Campoli and Theodore Halkin. Many of the artists are united by their common experiences and pastimes. Almost all of the men who have work in the exhibition severed in World War II. The impact that this experience had on these men can be seen in the work featured in the first few rooms of the exhibition.
The exhibition’s co-curator, John Corbett stated in an interview “I think what they were onto was what we now think of as the “age of anxiety,” and they were early comers to the anxiety that Americans experienced in the postwar period”.

Monster Roster is on show from February 11- June 12, 2016 at the Smart Museum of Art, Chicago.

5. KAWS: Yorkshire Sculpture Park

KAWS at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

KAWS at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Courtesy the artist and YSP KAWS, Small Lie (detail), 2013

Courtesy the artist and YSP KAWS, Small Lie (detail), 2013

The artist Brian Donnelly is known by the alias KAWS. The exhibition shows KAWS recent sculptures. The heads of the sculpture figures reference skull and crossbones. The bones take the place of ears and the many teeth replace the mouth. The eyes of the sculptures are substituted for the letter X; in a kind of X-marks the spot way.

The sculptures, who are of gigantic sizes, are placed in the Yorkshire Sculpture Park’s lakeside gardens. Donnelly says “I love the photos you can get from it and the rolling hills and these giant wooden pieces among all the trees.”

The characters in the exhibition have been a part of Donnelly’s language since his days as a graffiti artist in the 1990s. During this period Donnelly would modify ads on the sides of phone booths in New York.  Donnelly is a collector of toys and art. He often tells of his affinity for the work of artists such as Peter Saul and Joyce Pensato.

KAWS work is on view 6 February to 12 June, Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

 

 

2016, NewsClaudia ElliottComment