What's Happening In Art This Week

1. Holding the Pose: Portraits from the Collection

Brian Burke’s “Portrait of Libby Oughton,” 1987, oil on canvas. 

Brian Burke’s “Portrait of Libby Oughton,” 1987, oil on canvas. 

The active involvement of the sitter is a key feature of the portraits that feature in the exhibition Holding the Pose: Portraits from the Collection. The exhibition lays bare the interaction between the artist and the sitter. The show is evidence of the richness of the art of portraiture in Canada.

The exhibition includes many works by the Canadian portrait painter, Robert Harris. Gallery director Kevin Rice says “In the work of Robert Harris, we encounter an incredible richness and subtlety brought to bear on the craft of portraiture”. He continues by saying, “In the context of this exhibition, we have a great opportunity to see how the artist approached the vibrant subjects of his paintings, and how they played a role in the final result.”

 Holding the Pose is on show at the Confederation Center from January 27 – November 27.
 

 2. International Pop: Philadelphia Museum of Art   

Dalila Puzzovio/Philadelphia Museum of Art

Dalila Puzzovio/Philadelphia Museum of Art

International pop views the pop art movement as a truly international artistic movement. The exhibition includes women, not as an afterthought but rather as key figures who participated in the experimentation and play that defined Pop.

 Erica F. Battle, associate curator of contemporary art at the Philadelphia museum said “It was a natural direction for us to take in an exhibition that was trying to expand our understanding of Pop art, and go beyond the canonical telling, which is that it was largely American and male-dominated.” Pop explored everyday culture, celebrated sex and recirculated imagery that was challenging traditional ideas about gender. It emerged during a time period, post-World War 11, that was looking at and questioning the roles women played in society. 

 Dalila Puzzovio is an Argentine artist whose work appears in the exhibition. Puzzovio’s work has blurred the lines between fashion and conceptual art. “Dalila Doble Platforma” look like they may be found a high-end women’s boutique shop.

International Pop is on display at the Philidelphia Museum of Art now Through May 15, 2016

 

3. Sudarshan Shetty

Sudarshan Shetty, Shoonya Ghar (Empty House), 2016, HD video, color, sound, 59 minutes.

Sudarshan Shetty, Shoonya Ghar (Empty House), 2016, HD video, color, sound, 59 minutes.

Sudarshan lives and works in Mumbai. His sculptural works deal with the themes of loss, regeneration, transience and the precariousness of life. The exhibition features an hour-long film and sculptural installations featuring the sets from the film. Other works are also included in the exhibition.

Sudarshan says “The film is the central piece in the whole show for me. In it you see three things which all work together—the Indian music, the performance, and the building up of the set. These are parallel activities. The protagonist is the building of the set itself that is being created throughout the film, and characters come and go. I thought of it as a performative space.”  The title of the exhibition “Shoonya Ghar” is found in the poetry of the eleventh century poet Gorakhnath. Gorakhnath’s poetry speaks of a yogi who is wandering around a city that is comprised of ten doors. Each door refers to one opening in the body.

Shoonya Ghar is on show at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Delhi and runs through March 6, 2016. 
 

4. Cosmic Art

Shezad Dawood CEJ 4', 2011, acrylic on vintage textile 160 x 210cm

Shezad Dawood CEJ 4', 2011, acrylic on vintage textile 160 x 210cm

Cosmic art is an exhibition that traces the ways in which tantra has inspired art in India and the world. The French poet Franck Andre Jamme, commented on the tantric he saw in India, “So strange it is to find in a land so baroque as to almost be overflowing with images, images that are so concise as to almost be dry.” It is a popular conception that Indian art is lush and full of detail, yet this tradition of the tantra exists, where a wealth of meaning is conveyed in simple shapes and symbols. In the exhibition there is an anonymous tantric drawing that depicts dark elongated oval. The shape is representative of the source of the universe; the brahmanda or the cosmic egg.

The artists are from all over the globe and include names as diverse as Jagdish Swaminathan, Biren De, Acharya Vyakul, Anthony Pearson, Tom Chamberlain and Claudia Wieser.
Thinking Tantra is on at Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai, till March 19

 

5. Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art

Eugène Delacroix, 'Self Portrait', about 1837     

Eugène Delacroix, 'Self Portrait', about 1837     

“We all paint in Delacroix’s language,” observed Cezanne.Eugene Delacroix was one of the first modern masters and he transformed French painting in the 19th century. His influence can be seen, among other places, in the bold colors and abstract shapes of Kandinsky and Matisse and the complimentary colors of the impressionists. 
Delaxroix and the Rise of Modern Art is an homage to this leading exponent of French Romanticism. Delacroix’s paintings include stories of love, murder, violence and war. The exhibition traces 50 years of Delacroix’s work and places him alongside contemporaries such as Chasseriau and Coubet.   The exhibition gives visitors the opportunity to familiarize or re- familiarize themselves with the works of Delacroix.

It will include over 60 works borrowed from 30 major public and private collections around the world.