What's Happening In Art This Week

1. Outsider Art in Amsterdam

Sawada, Untitled, 20 x 23,5 x 39 cm, ceramic, 2006-2010, Collection Dolhuys

Sawada, Untitled, 20 x 23,5 x 39 cm, ceramic, 2006-2010, Collection Dolhuys

Hermitage Amsterdam has opened a new museum inside of their building space. The Outsider Art Museum is dedicated to recent Outsider Art from all over the world and comprises over 100 works of artists like Keisuke Ishino and Derk Wessels.

Outsider Art is made by people who have not been educated at any art institute. Many outsider artists also have a history of mental illness or have an intellectual impediment. Although the name was coined in 1972, it was the 2013 Venice Biennale that led to a breakthrough for this specific artform and its artists. The Biennale also launched the career of Japanese artist Shinichi Sawada, whose work is among that shown at the Outside Art Museum.

The Outsider Art Museum is open daily from 10-17 as part of the Hermitage Amsterdam.

2. Whistler's Mother arrives in Australia

Whistler - Portrait of the artists' mother (1871)

Whistler - Portrait of the artists' mother (1871)

Whistler's famous Portrait of the artists' mother (1871) has been borrowed from the Musee d'Orsay in Paris by the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) in Melbourne, Australia. This world-famous portrait, originally simply named Arrangement in Grey and Black, is part of an art exchange programme between the two museums.There are a lot of extras accompanying the painting, including in-depth background information on the reception of the work, a short film and an exhibition on the influence Whistler has had on prominent Australian artists like John Longstaff and Hugh Ramsay. The museum is open from 10-17 daily but make sure to plan your visit ahead as this painting will most likely attract large crowds.

Whistler's Mother can be seen from March 26th – June 19th 2016 at NGV International.

3. Hedda Sterne's Machines

Sterne – Machine 5 (1950)

Sterne – Machine 5 (1950)

Romanian-born Hedda Sterne was one of the only women in the Abstract Expressionist group of Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and others. Although not as well-known as her male counterparts, her work is just as exciting.

Van Doren Waxter in New York now shows a series of paintings from 1947-1951 that let us in on Sterne's enthousiasm for the big city and its machineries (she had moved from Europe to the USA in 1941). Engine parts, wheels, streets and appliances make up her surrealistic machines, vibrating and full of life.

This exhibit is on at Van Doren Waxter at 23E 73 St in New York until April 29th 2016.

4. The Spanish Master of Light in Germany

Joaquín Sorolla, Capturing the Moment, 1906. Oil on canvas, 62 x 93,5 cm, Museo Sorolla, Madrid

Joaquín Sorolla, Capturing the Moment, 1906. Oil on canvas, 62 x 93,5 cm, Museo Sorolla, Madrid

"I hate darkness. Claude Monet once said that painting in general did not have light enough in it. I agree with him. We painters, however, can never reproduce sunlight as it really is. I can only approach the truth of it.” The Kunsthalle in Munich shows the first comprehensive retrospective in Germany of the work of the Spanish painter Joaquín Sorolla (1863–1923), renowned for his depiction of the effects of light. His landscapes and beach scenes are at the heart of this exhibition, that spans the entire career of this eccentric painter, of whom one of his students, Richard Schmid, said that “he paints like a pig eats”. Sorolla's work can be seen in Munich from March 4 to July 3, 2016

5. Japanese Spring

The National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo celebrates the start of spring with sakura-themed art; depictions of cherrytrees, blossoming in early spring. The museum shows us famous paintings like Kawai Gyukudo's folding-screen Parting Spring, but has also got a lot of rarities from their own collection on display.

The name of the exhibit is “Nihonga Festival”, referring to the Japanese term for paintings that have been made according to traditional Japanese artistic conventions, techniques and materials. That the Nihonga style is still prominent can be seen in this exhibiton, that shows work from both older as well as more recent art periods.

The cherry trees are in bloom through May 11th 2016 in the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.