What's Happening In Art This Week

Painters' Paintings

Lucian Freud – After Cezanne (1999-2000)

Lucian Freud – After Cezanne (1999-2000)

The National Gallery in London explores the connections between painters and the paintings they possess themselves. Inspiration comes from works in the National Gallery Collection that were once owned by painters like Freud, Matisse, Degas and Van Dyck. The exhibit investigates why painters bought other painters'works and looks at the relation between the painters and the work. On display is work that spans over 500 years of painting history, of which about half are loans from public and private collections.
Painters' Paintings runs until the 4th of September 2016.

 

Totem

Totem, artist impression

Totem, artist impression

The National Gallery of Singapore hosts a new large scale sculpture by Singaporean artist Chun Kai Feng on their roof garden gallery. This white totem is inspired by the concrete benches seen on the ground of the Housing Development Board estates, but in this case the benches are white and glossy instead of grey and simple. Chun Kai Feng graduated from the Glasgow School of Art in 2010 and makes works based on ordinary urban elements.
Totem is free to visit daily at the Ng Teng Roof Garden Gallery.

 

Rester Vivant

Exhibit image

Exhibit image

The Palais de Tokyo has been taken over by writer Michael Houellebecq this summer, as he creates “Rester Vivant” (“Staying Alive”). The show, which opened on the 23rd of June, has been veiled in mystery until now. According to the museum, it will demonstrate how the writer has produced a form that contributes to the reinvention of exhibitions, by mixing up literature and photography, fact and fiction. The exhibit is made up of sounds, photographs, installations and films by Houellebecq, plus work of guest artists like Robert Combas and Maurice Renoma.
Rester Vivant is on until September 11th, 2016, daily except Tuesdays from noon until midnight.

 

Light, Time, Legacy

A Sepulchre by the road between Rome and the Pinte Nomentana, 1780

A Sepulchre by the road between Rome and the Pinte Nomentana, 1780

The British Museum is still showing a free exhibit of Francis Towne's watercolours of Rome. Towne (1739-1816) made these during a visit to Rome in 1780-1781 and they include famous monuments like the Colosseum, Palatine Hill and the Forum. The 52 views of Rome are among the great creative landmarks in the history of British watercolour art and were also key to Towne's re-appreciation in the 20th century.
The Roman watercolours are free to visit until the 24th of August, 2016.

 

Notion Motion

Notion Motion, Foto by Hans Wilschut

Notion Motion, Foto by Hans Wilschut

Olafur Eliasson is everywhere this year, it seems. MuseumBoymans van Beuningen in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, has just opened his installation from 2005, “Notion Motion”. This edition of the installation has been remade especially for the 1500m2 Bodongallery. Three different light projections show the connection between light and water and looks at vibrations and waves.
Boymans van Beuningen hosts Notion Motion until the 18th of September, 2016.

 

 

2016, NewsSiOTT Gallery