What's Happening In Art This Week

Adriaen van de Velde: Dutch Master of Landscape

Adriaen van de Velde, Portrait of a Couple with Two Children and a Nurse in a Landscape, 1667.

Adriaen van de Velde, Portrait of a Couple with Two Children and a Nurse in a Landscape, 1667.

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam is staging the first ever retrospective of work by Adriaen van de Velde (1632-1672), one of the greatest landscape painters of the Golden Age. The exhibit features 60 works from private collections and museums like the Louvre and the British Museum. Van de Velde lived a short life. He was already known as an outstanding painter of people and animals during his lifetime, but his posthumous fame dwindled. The Rijksmuseum hopes to reinstate Van de Velde and show the general public his enormous skill and attention to detail.
The landscapes are on display until the 2nd of September 2016, daily from 9:00-18:00.
 

Dadaglobe Reconstructed

Exhibit Image

Exhibit Image

The MoMA in New York displays over 100 works created for Dadaglobe, Tristan Tzara’s planned but unrealized magnum opus, originally planned for publication in 1921. Dadaglobe was an ambitious anthology that aimed to document Dada’s international activities. Tzara invited 50 artists from 10 countries to submit artworks in four categories: photographic self-portraits, photographs of artworks, original drawings, and layouts for book pages. The exhibition brings together these works, along with related archival material. Though never published, due to financial and organizational difficulties, Tzara’s project addresses concerns about art’s reproducibility that continue to be relevant today.
The MoMA shows this exhibit until the 18th of September 2016.

 

Mika Rottenberg in Paris

Mika Rottenberg

Mika Rottenberg

 For her second solo show in France, video artist Mika Rottenberg (1976, Buenos Aires) revisits several of the installations that brought her international reputation. The show features NoNoseKnows (2015),  Bowls Balls Souls Holes, (2014), SEVEN (2011) and Squeeze (2010), and also presents a selection of recent and new works specially produced for the exhibition. Rottenberg often reaches out to women whose physical extremities have been shown on the internet. Their bodies for the inspiration for her films.
Rottenberg's work can be seen in Palais de Tokyo, Paris, until September 11th, 2016.

 

Armando in Bergen

Armando, Vijandig 74-78

Armando, Vijandig 74-78

The Kranenberg Gallery in Bergen, the Netherlands, presents an exhibit with 50 works of the famous Dutch artist Armando (1929). Armando was inspired by the Cobra movement who started out as a musician and poet but showed his first paintings in 1953 and has been a visual artist ever since. A lot of his work is inspired by the Second World War and he coins the phrase “guilty landscape” for landscapes that have “seen” things happen (like war crimes). Bergen is the city he works and lives in for at least part of the year, and so it is fitting to have this large exhibit take place in this inspiring small town.
This exhibit is on until the 27th of November, 2016.
 

Yayoi Kusama – In Infinity

Yayoi Kusama, Suit, ca. 1962

Yayoi Kusama, Suit, ca. 1962

Yayoi Kusama’s (1929) artistic practice has fascinated people for over six decades. She moves between painting and sculpture, between art and design, and between East and West. The Japanese-born artist moved to New York in 1957 and created all sorts of performances and happenings that drew extra attention due to the fact that she was a woman. The Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden now features Kusamas work in a retrospective exhibition covering her oeuvre from early nature studies to installations that suspend time and space.
See Kusama's work until the 11th of September, 2016